1800 -1899 (Asian/Pacific Islander)
1820
Transcontinental Railroad

First Chinese begin to migrate to work as cheap labor on the transcontinental railroad.

1843
Japanese Immigrants Arrive

The first documented Japanese arrive in United States.

1848
Chinese Miners

Strike of gold in CA draws Chinese immigrant miners to West Coast to mine gold.

1850
Foreign Miner’s Tax

California imposes Foreign Miner’s Tax and enforces it mainly against Chinese miners.

1854
People v. Hall

People v. Hall rules that Chinese cannot give testimony in court against whites

1854
The Treaty of Kanagawa

U.S. and Japan sign first treaty.

1858
Chinese/Mongolian Ban

California passes a law to bar entry of Chinese and “Mongolians.”

1859
Education Ban

Chinese excluded from San Francisco public schools.

1860
Japanese Diplomacy

Japan sends its first diplomatic mission to U.S.

1862
Police Tax

California imposes a “police tax” of $2.50 a month on every Chinese person.

1868
Burlingame-Seward Treaty

U.S. and China sign Burlingame-Seward Treaty recognizing right of their citizens to emigrate.

1869
Transcontinental Railroad Completed

Chinese laborers build most of the western section.

1870
Naturalization Act

Naturalization Act bans Chinese from becoming citizens.

1872
Civil Procedure Code

California’s Civil Procedure Code drops law barring Chinese court testimony.

1875
Page Law

Page Law in Congress bars entry of Chinese, Japanese, “Mongolian” contract laborers.

1878
re Ah Yup

Court decision, re Ah Yup rules Chinese ineligible for naturalized citizenship.

1879
California’s Second Constitution

California’s second constitution prevents municipalities and corporations from employing Chinese.

1880
U.S./China Treaty

U.S. and China sign treaty giving U.S. the right to limit but “not absolutely prohibit” Chinese immigration.

1882
Chinese Exclusion Act

Chinese Exclusion Act prohibits migration of new Chinese laborers for 10 yrs.

1884
Chinese Schools

Chinese Six Companies sets up Chinese schools.

1884
San Francisco's “Oriental School”

San Francisco builds segregated “Oriental School” in response to Mamie Tape case

1886
Forceful Expulsion of Chinese

Residents of Tacoma, Seattle and elsewhere in the American West forcibly expel Chinese people. 

1886
Hawaii Immgration Ends

Chinese immigration to Hawaii ends.

1886
Yick Wo v. Hopkins

Chinese laundrymen win in Yick Wo v. Hopkins case which declares a law with unequal impact on different groups is discriminatory.

1888
Scott Act

Scott Act renders 20,000 Chinese reentry certificates null and void.

1889
Chae Chan Ping v. U.S.

Chae Chan Ping v. U.S. upholds constitutionality of Chinese exclusion laws.

1892
Geary Act

Geary Act requires Chinese residents of the U.S. to carry a resident permit